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Visual Awareness

Contemporary Visual Arts Magazine
As part of the Elektra KB exhibition “The Cathara Insurgent Women Vs The Theocratic Republic of Gaia Beings (May 29 - June 22, 2013) at Allegra LaViola Gallery.Come out this Saturday June 15th at 4PM! for the last SPECIAL EDITION! live performance of MADAME LAMORT, a CATALYTIC CONFESSIONAL NOISE CEREMONY.
http://www.allegralaviola.com/Exhibit_Detail.cfm?ShowsID=79
http://elektrakb.blogspot.com/2013/06/performance-june-15th-4pm-at-allegra.html
https://www.facebook.com/events/147870435398402

As part of the Elektra KB exhibition “The Cathara Insurgent Women Vs The Theocratic Republic of Gaia Beings (May 29 - June 22, 2013) at Allegra LaViola Gallery.

Come out this Saturday June 15th at 4PM! for the last SPECIAL EDITION! live performance of MADAME LAMORT, a CATALYTIC CONFESSIONAL NOISE CEREMONY.

http://www.allegralaviola.com/Exhibit_Detail.cfm?ShowsID=79

http://elektrakb.blogspot.com/2013/06/performance-june-15th-4pm-at-allegra.html

https://www.facebook.com/events/147870435398402

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prostheticknowledge:

The Pirate Cinema (Video)

I covered this last week, but now you can see the installation in action.

An installation displays films currently pirated on peer-to-peer networks:

In the context of omnipresent telecommunications surveillance, “The Pirate Cinema” makes the hidden activity and geography of Peer-to-Peer file sharing visible. The project is presented as a monitoring room, which shows Peer-to-Peer transfers happening in real time on networks using the BitTorrent protocol. The installation produces an arbitrary cut-up of the files currently being exchanged. This immediate and fragmentary rendering of digital activity, with information concerning its source and destination, thus depicts the topology of digital media consumption and uncontrolled content dissemination in a connected world.

* Site: http://thepiratecinema.com/
* Video: https://vimeo.com/67518774
* Flickr: goo.gl/VSNQh





Reading group: AUTONOMIA, OCCUPY, COMMUNISM: LEGACIES AND FUTURES
Tuesday, May 21st, 2013 / 6:30pm until 8:30pm
http://e-flux.com
Event page: facebook.com/events/444596638964251
 
For the duration of Rossella Biscotti’s exhibition “The Trial”, e-flux will be hosting a regular reading group devoted to exploring the histories and legacies of the Italian Autonomia movement as they reverberate in contemporary struggles in the US–including but not limited to Occupy and its aftermath. Loosely facilitated by the editors of Tidal: Occupy Theory, Occupy Strategy and others, the reading group aims to create space for an extended intergenerational conversation about life, labor, and liberation.




The first several sessions will involve collective learning about the background, trajectory, and political innovations of Autonomia: first, the bottom-up “workerist” politics of Potere Operaio, as well as the importance of labor militants such as James Boggs in the United States to the formation of operaismo; from there, the group will track the cresting of Autonomia in 1977 as a decentralized, experimental political culture encompassing social actors beyond that of the factory worker such as precarious students and feminist intiatives such as Wages for Housework. This will provide an opportunity to discuss the tactics and organizing of Autonomia, but also the subjective and affective dimensions of the movement as embodied in various forms of cultural production such as Alberto Grifi’s Il festival del proletario giovanile al Parco Lambro (Festival of the Young Proletariat at Parco Lambro) (1976) Nanni Belestrini’s We Want Everything (1971), and the phenomenon of the Metropolitan Indians. From there, we will arrive to the massive state repression of Autonomia in the name of anti-terrorism (the subject of Biscotti’s work). Throughout, we will consider the porosity of the Italian context relative to kindred developments elsewhere in Europe and beyond.A further strand of possible inquiry concerns the rich reception-history of the Autonomist tradition in the United States, encompassing intellectual networks, political struggles, and shifting economic conditions of global capitalism. Key links would include Wages for Housework, Semiotext(e), the Midnight Notes Collective, and most recently and prominently, the explosion of retroactive interest in Autonomia thinkers catalyzed in the English-speaking world by the publication of Hardt and Negri’s Empire at the ripe historical moment of the counter-globalization movement. Since then, concepts such as Post-Fordism, immaterial labor, collective intelligence, and constituent power have become important points of reference for artists, academics, and political organizers. Why has the Autonomia legacy struck such a chord in the past decade? And how does it relate to the resurgent interest in communism, communization, and commoning as political horizons in the present?Discussions indebted to Autonomia have fed directly into the phenomenon of Occupy in its verious iterations over the past two years. The ongoing and multifarious project of Occupy will constitute a consistent thread of the reading group, culminating in several concluding discussions devoted explicitly to recent movements in the US and beyond. Texts by theorists and organizers–including some with biographical ties to the histories in question such as Michael Hardt, George Caffentzis and Silvia Federici–may be drawn on as prompts for new questions grounded in recent experience and geared toward the future.Contact laura@e-flux.com for more details.WEEK 1: Tuesday, May 21stIntroduction:This session will begin with a brief introduction to the overall reading group. The series of texts listed below are proposed to lay out the broad historical and theoretical trajectory for the group in coming weeks as provoked by Rosella Biscotti’s The Trial. They include both archival documents and retrospective analyses of the expanded Autonomia period in the 1970s and its afterlives in the early twenty-first century. How and why does Autonomia resonate today for us in the ongoing aftermath of Occupy and related movements around the world? These questions of historical resonance will preoccupy discusisons throughout the duration of the group, but the first session will set out some basic points of reference to be fleshed out and debated in future sessions.The readings below for the first session are available to download here:http://www.e-flux.com/program/reading-group-autonomia-occupy-communism-legacies-and-futures/Paolo Virno, untitled testimony from “April 7th” trial (1983-84)Sylvere Lotringer and Christian Marazzi, “The Return of Politics,” in Lotringer, ed. Autonomia: Post-Political Politics (1980), pp. 8-20Michael Hardt, “Introduction: Laboratory Italy” in Hardt, ed. Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics (1996), pp. 1-10Sylvere Lotringer, “Foreword,” in Paolo Virno, Grammar of the Multitude (2004), 7-18Branden W. Joseph, “Interview with Paolo Virno,” Grey Room 21 (2005)
  • Tuesday, May 21st, 2013 / 6:30pm until 8:30pm
     
    For the duration of Rossella Biscotti’s exhibition “The Trial”, e-flux will be hosting a regular reading group devoted to exploring the histories and legacies of the Italian Autonomia movement as they reverberate in contemporary struggles in the US–including but not limited to Occupy and its aftermath. Loosely facilitated by the editors of Tidal: Occupy Theory, Occupy Strategy and others, the reading group aims to create space for an extended intergenerational conversation about life, labor, and liberation.


The first several sessions will involve collective learning about the background, trajectory, and political innovations of Autonomia: first, the bottom-up “workerist” politics of Potere Operaio, as well as the importance of labor militants such as James Boggs in the United States to the formation of operaismo; from there, the group will track the cresting of Autonomia in 1977 as a decentralized, experimental political culture encompassing social actors beyond that of the factory worker such as precarious students and feminist intiatives such as Wages for Housework. This will provide an opportunity to discuss the tactics and organizing of Autonomia, but also the subjective and affective dimensions of the movement as embodied in various forms of cultural production such as Alberto Grifi’s Il festival del proletario giovanile al Parco Lambro (Festival of the Young Proletariat at Parco Lambro) (1976) Nanni Belestrini’s We Want Everything (1971), and the phenomenon of the Metropolitan Indians. From there, we will arrive to the massive state repression of Autonomia in the name of anti-terrorism (the subject of Biscotti’s work). Throughout, we will consider the porosity of the Italian context relative to kindred developments elsewhere in Europe and beyond.

A further strand of possible inquiry concerns the rich reception-history of the Autonomist tradition in the United States, encompassing intellectual networks, political struggles, and shifting economic conditions of global capitalism. Key links would include Wages for Housework, Semiotext(e), the Midnight Notes Collective, and most recently and prominently, the explosion of retroactive interest in Autonomia thinkers catalyzed in the English-speaking world by the publication of Hardt and Negri’s Empire at the ripe historical moment of the counter-globalization movement. Since then, concepts such as Post-Fordism, immaterial labor, collective intelligence, and constituent power have become important points of reference for artists, academics, and political organizers. Why has the Autonomia legacy struck such a chord in the past decade? And how does it relate to the resurgent interest in communism, communization, and commoning as political horizons in the present?

Discussions indebted to Autonomia have fed directly into the phenomenon of Occupy in its verious iterations over the past two years. The ongoing and multifarious project of Occupy will constitute a consistent thread of the reading group, culminating in several concluding discussions devoted explicitly to recent movements in the US and beyond. Texts by theorists and organizers–including some with biographical ties to the histories in question such as Michael Hardt, George Caffentzis and Silvia Federici–may be drawn on as prompts for new questions grounded in recent experience and geared toward the future.

Contact laura@e-flux.com for more details.



WEEK 1: Tuesday, May 21st


Introduction:

This session will begin with a brief introduction to the overall reading group. The series of texts listed below are proposed to lay out the broad historical and theoretical trajectory for the group in coming weeks as provoked by Rosella Biscotti’s The Trial. They include both archival documents and retrospective analyses of the expanded Autonomia period in the 1970s and its afterlives in the early twenty-first century. How and why does Autonomia resonate today for us in the ongoing aftermath of Occupy and related movements around the world? These questions of historical resonance will preoccupy discusisons throughout the duration of the group, but the first session will set out some basic points of reference to be fleshed out and debated in future sessions.

The readings below for the first session are available to download here:http://www.e-flux.com/program/reading-group-autonomia-occupy-communism-legacies-and-futures/

Paolo Virno, untitled testimony from “April 7th” trial (1983-84)

Sylvere Lotringer and Christian Marazzi, “The Return of Politics,” in Lotringer, ed. Autonomia: Post-Political Politics (1980), pp. 8-20

Michael Hardt, “Introduction: Laboratory Italy” in Hardt, ed. Radical Thought in Italy: A Potential Politics (1996), pp. 1-10

Sylvere Lotringer, “Foreword,” in Paolo Virno, Grammar of the Multitude (2004), 7-18

Branden W. Joseph, “Interview with Paolo Virno,” Grey Room 21 (2005)

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(Procession in Colonized Territory, 2013, Archival pigment prints, fabric, felt, thread, 36 x 54 inches. By Elektra KB)
Elektra KB - BRAVIN LEE GALLERY - Opening Next Wednesday, May 22, 6-8pm
ELEKTRA KB"There Are Women at the Gates Seeking a New World…"May 22 – June 28, 2013Opening: Wednesday, May 22nd, 6-8pmBravinLee Gallery - 526 West 26th Street #211, NY - NYBravinLee programs is pleased to present an exhibition in the gallery’s project room by Elektra KB of new works on paper, photography, and a selection of cloth pages of her 20 page, hand-sewn artist’s book.The pages of the book, each a sewn and embroidered felt collage, depict guerilla warfare in a mythological, semi-autobiographical world parallel to ours: a female rebel army revolting against the forces of a tyrannical police state. The women are primitivist and often uniformed and weaponized—most wear only short petticoats and veils or ominous balaklava. They pose brazenly with machine guns and chainsaws in photo ops, but Elektra KB has rendered these weapons more like toys, and according to her rule-set for this alternative world, they shoot rays of light not ammo.As in Anthony Burgess’ “A Clockwork Orange,” Elektra KB’s world subsists on a complex play of invented language and iconography; however, her protagonists are righteous. “The Cathara Insurgent Women”—dancing warriors, rebels, heretics—fight against the shadowy forces of “The Theocratic Republic of Gaia”. The Insurgents call to mind simultaneously today’s feminists and activists like Susana Chavez, Medieval heretics, and the Aztecs in the era of Spanish conquest.Throughout the pages of the book, shadows leak and flow together representing the forces of Neo-colonization: mass scale and conspiratorial violence and murder, repression of free speech, and the oppression and alienation of women. Threads hang loosely from these shadows and war iconography, representing catharsis, repression, Barbarism, and physical emancipation à la Freud’s Death Drive.The title of the show is a modification of text, “There are men at the gates seeking a new world,” extracted from an essay in the first issue of a magazine produced by the late 1960s art group Black Mask (later Up Against the Wall Motherfuckers). The group, formed by painter Ben Morea and poet Dan Georgakas, declared that revolutionary art should be an integral part of life, as in primitive society, and not an appendage to wealth.Elektra KB is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts (2012). In 2013, her work has been exhibited in the group exhibitions “All The Best People” at 1 to 1 Gallery, New York, reviewed in Artforum (March 2013) by Carolyn Busta, and “Changing the World Through Art” at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York. She will also have a solo exhibition in New York at Allegra LaViola Gallery, “The Cathara Insurgent Women vs. The Theocratic Republic of Gaia Beings,” opening May 29th, 2013, and a monograph of her work published by Tangled Wilderness/Combustion Books is due later this spring.For more information, please contact BravinLee programs at 212.462.4404 or info@bravinlee.com
Related links:
- elektrakb.blogspot.com
- elektrakb.com

(Procession in Colonized Territory, 2013, Archival pigment prints, fabric, felt, thread, 36 x 54 inches. By Elektra KB)

Elektra KB - BRAVIN LEE GALLERY - Opening Next Wednesday, May 22, 6-8pm

ELEKTRA KB
"There Are Women at the Gates Seeking a New World…"

May 22 – June 28, 2013
Opening: Wednesday, May 22nd, 6-8pm
BravinLee Gallery - 526 West 26th Street #211, NY - NY

BravinLee programs is pleased to present an exhibition in the gallery’s project room by Elektra KB of new works on paper, photography, and a selection of cloth pages of her 20 page, hand-sewn artist’s book.

The pages of the book, each a sewn and embroidered felt collage, depict guerilla warfare in a mythological, semi-autobiographical world parallel to ours: a female rebel army revolting against the forces of a tyrannical police state. The women are primitivist and often uniformed and weaponized—most wear only short petticoats and veils or ominous balaklava. They pose brazenly with machine guns and chainsaws in photo ops, but Elektra KB has rendered these weapons more like toys, and according to her rule-set for this alternative world, they shoot rays of light not ammo.

As in Anthony Burgess’ “A Clockwork Orange,” Elektra KB’s world subsists on a complex play of invented language and iconography; however, her protagonists are righteous. “The Cathara Insurgent Women”—dancing warriors, rebels, heretics—fight against the shadowy forces of “The Theocratic Republic of Gaia”. The Insurgents call to mind simultaneously today’s feminists and activists like Susana Chavez, Medieval heretics, and the Aztecs in the era of Spanish conquest.

Throughout the pages of the book, shadows leak and flow together representing the forces of Neo-colonization: mass scale and conspiratorial violence and murder, repression of free speech, and the oppression and alienation of women. Threads hang loosely from these shadows and war iconography, representing catharsis, repression, Barbarism, and physical emancipation à la Freud’s Death Drive.

The title of the show is a modification of text, “There are men at the gates seeking a new world,” extracted from an essay in the first issue of a magazine produced by the late 1960s art group Black Mask (later Up Against the Wall Motherfuckers). The group, formed by painter Ben Morea and poet Dan Georgakas, declared that revolutionary art should be an integral part of life, as in primitive society, and not an appendage to wealth.

Elektra KB is a graduate of the School of Visual Arts (2012). In 2013, her work has been exhibited in the group exhibitions “All The Best People” at 1 to 1 Gallery, New York, reviewed in Artforum (March 2013) by Carolyn Busta, and “Changing the World Through Art” at Marianne Boesky Gallery, New York. She will also have a solo exhibition in New York at Allegra LaViola Gallery, “The Cathara Insurgent Women vs. The Theocratic Republic of Gaia Beings,” opening May 29th, 2013, and a monograph of her work published by Tangled Wilderness/Combustion Books is due later this spring.

For more information, please contact BravinLee programs at 212.462.4404 or info@bravinlee.com

Related links:

elektrakb.blogspot.com

elektrakb.com

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Figure #1: Stability

After the formation officers may leave the area.

Via HYPERALLERGIC: Timofey Radya’s “Figure #1: Stability” is a standout of Cutlog’s inaugural New York show (all photographs by Mostafa Heddaya) Read more…

Via artsy/hyperallergic
Fred Tomaselli's New York Times frontpage prints and drawings are another example of an artist who uses the city in fascinating (and indirect) ways. In works like Nov. 11, 2010(2011) Tomaselli takes a city icon and transforms the main image with his trippy sensibility to make it come alive. It’s his way of talking back and transforming news into something more timeless. This city has magical tendencies and we think these works capture a little of that pixie dust.

Via artsy/hyperallergic

Fred Tomaselli's New York Times frontpage prints and drawings are another example of an artist who uses the city in fascinating (and indirect) ways. In works like Nov. 11, 2010(2011) Tomaselli takes a city icon and transforms the main image with his trippy sensibility to make it come alive. It’s his way of talking back and transforming news into something more timeless. This city has magical tendencies and we think these works capture a little of that pixie dust.

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No Longer Empty, presents: 

HOW MUCH DO I OWE YOU?

A personal and conversational exploration into the new iterations of currency, value and exchange at this time of financial flux, growing debt and job insecurity.

From the virtualization of money to the rise of non-monetary barter networks, recent years have seen a re-thinking of forms and systems of exchange, and thus notions of value, commodity, and debt that surround them.

Inspired by the Bank building and the surrounding neighborhood, 26 artists from 15 countries confront these issues and how they are negotiated in the workforce, housing market, and in the every day. Curated by Chief Curator, Manon Slome, the public will experience a variety of media, from sound installations, projections, and film to participatory projects, immersive installations and large scale sculptures.

See more information at: http://www.nolongerempty.org/nc/home/…

NO LONGER EMPTY
http://www.nolongerempty.org

Join the conversation - answer or ask #howmuch? @nolongerempty

image

20-year-old artist Jennifer Pawluck was arrested Wednesday morning at 10:30am after posting a picture of anti-police street art on her Instagram feed a few days before.

“Many of my friends do not like the police,” Pawluck told the Huffington Post Québec in French. “I thought it would be funny to put the picture on Instagram. I do not even know who he is, Ian Lafrenière.”

READ MORE AT hyperallergic.com

Source: lenta.ru

Died “Russian Banksy” Pasha 183

Died street artist Pasha 183, also known as the “Russian Banksy.” This was on the night of April 2, said activist Roman Dobrokhotov in his Twitter referring to fellow artists.

No details about his death have not yet been reported.

Pasha 183 - alias street artist, known for its graffiti and installations performed mainly on the streets of Moscow. The artist known by the nickname LiveJournal183 , but his real name was the general public does not know: the artist to be discreet. Twitter user @ RodarFamily, friend, he said, with the artist, said that his name was Pasha Andropov. Also indicates that the artist was born in 1983. Earlier, in February 2012 on the channel “Rain” was published a note about Pasha 183, which said that he was “kind of name is Paul and he was about 28 years old.”

Pasha 183 is world-famous by the nickname “Russian Banksy” due to several British media to issue a note of it. In late January 2012, The Guardian published an articlein which the Pasha compared with 183 known British street artist Banksy (Banksy), which, like Pasha, to be discreet and hiding under a pseudonym.

Meanwhile, the artist in an interview AdMe, published in May 2012, said that he does not like being compared to Banksy. According to Pasha, before he had the nickname “Russian Banksy”, he spent 14 years formed his style, and a comparison with the English artist it hurts.

Pasha 183 work can be viewed on his personal website , and in the blog of the artist in Live Journal.

»> This interview appeared on AdMe.ru last spring. We did not touch a single word or image. Just “raise” him in memory of one of the most prominent and talented street artists in Russia.

Links related:

http://183art.ru/

http://183.livejournal.com/